Our Last Days in Ireland

Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel originally began as a wooden castle built upon a solid rock foundation with the primary function of protecting the Irish Kings of Munster.  It is believed to be the location where St. Patrick converted the King of Munster, King Aengus, to Christianity.  In fact, legend has it that during the baptism, St. Patrick stabbed King Aengus through the foot with his crozier. The king did not react to the pain, thinking the stabbing was just part of the rite of becoming a Christian.

After the Norman Invasion of then 11th century, the Kings of Munster no longer felt the rock provided adequate protection and donated the land to the church, who  immediately began building an abbey and stone fortress. Building continued on the site between the 12th and 16th centuries when it was over taken by English troops in 1647 (though most of the buildings on the site are from the 12th and 13 centuries).

These ruins gave us a taste of medieval architecture with its turrets, extensive graveyard with its beautiful high crosses and ornate abbey.

The tower was the first structure on the site, having been built in the early 12 century.

The tower was the first structure on the site, built in the early 12 century.

Romanesque arches of the cathedral.

The Romanesque arches of the cathedral.

Presently the ruins are in the process of restoration for safety reasons.

Presently the ruins are in the process of restoration for safety purposes.

Visible from the west side of the Rock are the desolate ruins of  an

Visible from the west side of the Rock are the desolate ruins of an undisturbed abbey.

Dakota waiting for our return.

Dakota waiting for our return.

 

Blarney castle,

Where tourists come to kiss the Blarney Stone and gain the gift of gab or blarney. No we didn’t, Steve’s stories are already long enough.

Blarney castle in the distance.

Blarney castle in the distance.

 

DSCN0856

 

University College Dublin

We were sad to have to contemplate leaving the breathtaking island of Ireland. We booked our return ferry ticket to Holyhead, Wales, UK. Our last stop in Ireland was a tour of the University of Dublin.We met up with a wonderful instructor of agriculture at this college,one of Europe’s top research intensive universities, who explained that this beautiful, friendly campus is home to an agriculture department that specializes in forestry, environmental science, agriculture science, and veterinary medicine.  We toured the agriculture school and the rest of the campus including a large new science building.

Entrance to University College Dublin

Entrance to University College Dublin

 

Agriculture Building

Agriculture Building

 

Jeanette enjoying the sunshine in the college square

Jeanette enjoying the sunshine in the college square

3 thoughts on “Our Last Days in Ireland

  1. Looks lovely! So green and beautiful! I really enjoy reading your posts! Went to the destruction derby at the Stan. Co. Fair last night! Thought of you. Probably don’t have those there….uniquely american!;)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s